November 18, 1883 — DN Bennett General Merchandise

1883 11 18

By 1883, DN Bennett has a ledger and a stamp for his store.  His location is Polkton, which is just across the county line from Center (Norwood).  The trip would be about 30 miles, which is some distance in 1882.

I can’t read the handwriting well enough to figure out what DJ had purchased.  However, $42 for anything back then was an expensive item!

This post is part of a series of transcriptions of letters, papers, receipts, and other ephemera that are held in the Smith Family Collection.  All originals are held in this collection, unless otherwise stated.

Seven Ancestors Ago–Absalom Caudle (52 Ancestors)

This post is a part of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge by Amy Johnson Crow at www.nostorytoosmall.com.

 

The Facts:

  • Born in Halifax County, Virginia 17591
  • Died in Stanly County in March 7, 18462
  • Married Elizabeth Maness3
  • He is my 5th great-grandfather via
    • His son, Sampson
    • His son, John Calvin
    • His daughter, Rosa Ann
    • Her daughter, Virginia
    • Her son
    • His daughter

There is quite a record concerning Absalom Caudle’s Revolutionary Pension.  He appeared in court to apply for a pension in October 1832.  He was approved.  The Stanly County court record clearly shows Caudle and his signature shows Caudel.  It’s pretty cool to have an ancestor who could sign his own name.  I don’t have too many of those this far back. However, on Fold3.com, his Revolutionary Pension papers have been annotated and indexed as Candel.

In his pension application, he states he was born in Halifax County, Virginia in 1759 and that he was living in Bladen County, NC when he enlisted and for a few years after the war.  He didn’t try to avoid serving, in fact, he substituted for others after his first enlistment. In 1779, he signed a petition against forming a new county from Bladen, Duplin, and New Hanover counties.  Sometime after this, he moved his family to Anson County, NC.

I haven’t been able to find him on the 1790 or 1800 census, however by 1810, he’s living in Anson County.  According to his pension application, he probably moved to Anson in the early 1780’s. There is at least one family bible that was sent to the war pension office to help prove that Elizabeth was indeed Absalom’s wife.  This bible remained there for nearly 50 years before being returned to Stanly County.  I’m not sure where this bible is now, but there images of a handwritten transcription of what was included in that bible (labeled Bible A) and a second (labeled Bible B).

This is where things get interesting for me.  When you look at the Bible A, Absalom and Elizabeth are married March 22, 1787 and have nine children over a 22 year span.  Their first being born in 1788.  Then, written in Bible B, there’s three children listed from 1818 to 1822.  While there’s no other information given regarding the mother, I found the dates to really be pressed for these children to belong to Elizabeth.  In my research, I started to find the following or similar statements:

Elizabeth was insane by 1815 and Absalom had children by another woman.  However, Elizabeth stayed on and they were never divorced.

Also, in a few places, I find the name Martha Parrish as the mother of the last three children.  Where did this name originate?  After Absalom’s death, Elizabeth filed for widow’s pension.  By this time in the 1840’s, it is documented that she’s insane.  It’s also documented that a Martha Parrish had filed for widow’s benefits.  What an interesting twist.  I haven’t found Martha Parrish’s application, but Elizabeth was finally proven to be Absalom’s wife and received his pension after his death.3

I would like to know where the theory about Elizabeth being deranged by 1815 and would love to see Martha’s pension application.  I do believe he had those three children by another woman.  Why didn’t she put herself in the second bible?  Since Martha applied for his pension, it makes sense that she would be the mother, but I have nothing concrete to base this upon.

Absalom Caudle died at the home of his son, Jesse, on the 7th of March, 1846.

-Died: At the residence of Capt. Jesse CAUDELL in Anson, on the 7th, Absalom CAUDELL, aged 89, a revolutionary soldier2

Sources:

  1. Caudel, Absalom Revolutionary War Pension Application
  2. Fayetteville Observer, Fayetteville, NC.  March 24, 1846
  3. Caudel, Elizabeth Widow’s Pension Application

Seven Ancestors Ago–George Shankle (52 Ancestors)

This post is a part of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge by Amy Johnson Crow at www.nostorytoosmall.com.

  • Born:  1754 in Anson County, NC
  • Died:  26 Sep 1841
  • He is my 5th great-grandfather via:
    • His daughter Oney
    • Her son, William Allen
    • His son, David Jones Allen
    • His daughter, Virginia Allen
    • Her son
    • His daughter

According to George Shankle’s Revolutionary War Pension Application of 1832, he was born in North Carolina in 1754.  According to the application, he lived

in North Carolina in that part of Anson county which was later Montgomery County on the southwest side of PeeDee river between Rocky River and PeeDee, two and on half miles from PeeDee on Jacobs Creek and the same distance from where he was born.  George Shankle enlisted in 1777 and served three months as private in Captain John Randle’s North Carolina Company.  After remaining at home a short while he enlisted and served three months as private in Captain Jesse McLendon’s North Carolina Company.  Soon afterward he again enlisted and served two months as private in Captain Buckner Kimbol’s North Carolina Company.  He also served various short tours as minuteman during the Revolution. (Source:  Letter from Veteran’s Administration dated June 22, 1940)

George Shankle was evidently married twice as the only wife I know of, Oney, was married previously to a James Raiford who died before 1830.  I haven’t found any evidence of who the mother of George Shankle’s children are.

On the 1840 census, he was living on the West Pee Dee River, listed himself as aged 60-69, a female as 50-59, and 10 slaves.

George Shankle was also a clergyman as he testifies on the behalf of other solders applying for pensions as well as in a statement of his death in the Carolina Observer dated 13 Oct 1841.

Another Revolutionary War soldier gone! 26th ult., at his residence in Stanly County, NC–Rev. George Shankle aged 90 years. For the last forty years, he was a preacher of the M.E. Church.

His wife, Oney, lived on in Anson County until after 1850.  She went west with a son and on the way back, perhaps, stopped in Camden, Alabama to visit her sister and died there 24 Feb 1855.  Proof of her marriages and parents are in her obituary posted in the Southern Christian Advocate.

Died in Camden, Wilcox Co., AL., Feb. 24, Mrs. Oney Shankle, born in Montgomery Co., about the year 1781. Her parents were Zedekiah and Tabitha Ledbetter. She was married successively to James Rayford and George Shankle. In 1851, she went to AR with her son, where she remained a couple of years in April last, stopped to see her sister in Camden

Children of George Shankle as listed in his will are:

  • Levi
  • Margaret
  • Tabitha
  • Barbary
  • Mary
  • Abia
  • Oney
  • Susannah
  • Eli
  • Henry

Sources:

  • Shankle, George, Revolutionary War Pension Application
  • Shankle, George, Federal Census 1790, 1800, 1830, 1840
  • Raiford, Oney, 1830 Federal Census
  • Allen Family History
  • Death Notices, Carolina Observer, 13 Oct 1841.
  • Southern Christian Advocate, Vol. I, 1837-1860
  • Will of George Shankle Sr