Amanuensis Monday

Harris Lee W Harris Reunion Tribute

The subject of this sketch, above named, was born in this vicinity, grew to manhood and made his home here all his natural life, having gone to his final and eternal home since the last meeting of Harris Reunion.  By trade, Lee was a shoe and harness maker, and he prosecuted this trade for many years for the late N.M. Thayer, when the village was known by the people as “Tanyard”, but later changed to Eldorado through the efforts and influence of the late John Davis from Tanyard to the present name.

It was during the time Lee W. Harris made shoes and harness that this writer, who was also employed by Mr. Thayer, learned to know the true value and rugged honesty of Lee Harris.

Lee joined the Baptist church at was then known as Big Creek Baptist church, and he lived, sofar as the writer believes, a true, upright Christian life thereafter; rendering valued service to the  church and the people with whom he mingled for three score or more years.

By profession:  Lee was a local Baptist preacher, serving as such in the churches of this and adjoining counties, until ill health compelled him to superanuate, but his superanuation did not prevent him from preaching occasionally, when circumstances were favorable, and his outstanding usefulness in this community was to conduct burial services for the dead, in which his remarks and admonition to the living were most impressive and effective.  He was usually the leader in singing, and was generally known as the leader not only in the Baptist churches, but in Methodist as well.

Lee loved to read his Bible and to impart to others the light and inspiration he gained by studying the Word.  He had no desire, nor did he expect to ever get worldly riches; but he did acquire that which is of far greater value and importance: Character, which will live and continue to live in the minds of all who knew him, especially by his immediate family for years to come.  His greatest ambition was to live an upright life and do the will of God and to exhort others to do likewise.

Lee was a member of Harris Reunion, and we shall miss him, this community will miss him, his family will miss him and the Church will miss him.  But he has gone the way we all must pass, sooner or later, whether we are prepared or not.  But if we live a life such as the writer believes the subject of this article lived, the promise is for us.

Respectfully submitted,

By the one who knew Lee.

T.N.H

 

P is for Preacher aka Five Ancestors Ago–LeeRoy Whitson Harris (52 Ancestors Week 16)

P

 

 

 

 

is for Preacher.

 

This post is a part of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge by Amy Johnson Crow at www.nostorytoosmall.com.

Rev. LeeRoy Whitson Harris is my 2nd great-grandfather via

  • his daughter, Alice Virgillia Harris
  • her daughter, Racie Elmira Harris
  • her son

The facts:

  • Born:  20 March 1853 to William Alexander & Ruth Holland Harris
  • Married:  Sarah Russell before 1874
  • Married:  Nancy Russell 6 Jan 1885
  • Died: 2 Jan 1840 of Mitral Insufficiency with contributing causes of hypertension and influenza

He was a shoemaker according to the 1880, 1900, and 1920 census.  In 1910, he was listed as a farmer.  Was this just the recorder listing everyone as a farmer, or did he actually give up shoe-making for a while?  By 1930, he was a clergyman of Baptist faith.

Here’s LeeRoy, second wife Nancy, and family.

Front: William, Travis, Oscar, Sylvia

Middle:  Nancy Russell & LeeRoy Whitson Harris

Back:  Georgia, Alice, Jessie

LeeRoy Harris Family--After

After
Harris, Lee Roy and family
before 1912

A memorial sketch given at the Harris Reunion after his death said this of his time as a Baptist preacher (transcribed verbatim):

By profession:  Lee was a local Baptist preacher, serving as such in the churches of this and adjoining counties, until ill health compelled him to superanuate, but his superanuation did not prevent him from preaching occasionally, when circumstances were favorable, and his outstanding usefulness in this community was to conduct burial services for the dead, in which his remarks and admonition to the living were most impressive and effective.  He was usually the leader in singing, and was generally known as the leader not only in the Baptist churches, but in Methodist as well.

 

Sources:

  • Harris, LeeRoy Whitson US Federal Census Records 1860, 1870, 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930.
  • Rev. Lee W. Harris tribute
  • Harris, Lee W death certificate

D is for Death Certificate aka Three Ancestors Ago–William Christopher Harris (52 Ancestors)

D

 

 

 

is for Death Certificate

In addition to the A to Z Challenge,  this post is a part of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge by Amy Johnson Crow at www.nostorytoosmall.com.

William Christopher Harris

harris, wm

  • Born:   December 25, 1871
  • Died April 27, 1924
  • Parents:  James Austin & Luscitta Harris
  • He is my direct ancestor via
  • his daughter, Racie E. Harris
  • her son

I never realized my great-grandfather lived for 12 years after my grandmother was born; after his wife died.  I mean, the children scattered, going to live with relatives or simply to be adopted by someone.  To my young mind, he wouldn’t have lived long after his wife died, leaving the children to grow up not even knowing each other.  My grandmother remembered seeing him a few times, but she was nearly 13 years old when he died.  I actually thought he went to the asylum (the crazy one) after his wife died and pretty much stayed there until he died.

Don’t get me wrong, he didn’t die there.  No, he was on his way home and got hit by a car.  Again, I thought, ‘how sad, to finally be on the way home and to die like that.”  Ironic, huh?

Not once I found this…

harris_william_christopher_deathcertificate

Clearly he stepped out in front of a truck, on purpose.  He’d only been there, at the State Hospital in Morganton, for three months.  I’ve requested any records they have on two different occasions with no answer.  I’m going to try again.  Then, if I get no answer, I’ll be making a road trip over the summer.  They could at least tell me, perhaps, if he’d spent more than one bout there.  There’s more to this story, I’m sure.  Evidence from the 1920 census indicates this.  I surely hope I can find out at least part of it.

Sources:

  • Racie E. Morris
  • Harris, William C.  North Carolina State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics.North Carolina Death Certificates. Microfilm S.123. Rolls 19-242, 280, 313-682, 1040-1297. North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Daylight Savings Time

Uncle Joe Harris, 1983

Uncle Joe Harris, 1983

Friday’s Faces from the Past

My father and grandmother in 1949, around May.  I’m pretty pleased with how this turned out.

Racie & Randy Morris--before

Racie Harris Morris & Randy–before

Racie & Randy Morris

Racie Harris Morris & Randy Morris–after

Friday Faces from the Past

Here’s another before and after photo for Friday Faces from the Past.

This is the LeeRoy Harris Family.  The picture was taken before 1812, because Alice died in 1812.  Georgia was the youngest child and she was born in 1897.  I suppose she could be around 12.

Several folks in this picture will appear in an upcoming 52 Ancestors post.  For the time being, a few facts.

In the center are LeeRoy Harris and his 2nd wife Nancy Elizabeth Russell.

LeeRoy’s daughter Alice is standing in the middle back.  She is my great-grandmother.  She died when my grandmother, Racie, was 6 months old.  Front left we find William Christopher Harris, Alice’s husband and Racie’s father.

Interestingly, I didn’t notice the writing in the upper portion of the photo until I was repairing it.  I think it says May G.

LeeRoy Harris Family--Before

Before
Harris, LeeRoy and family
before 1912

LeeRoy Harris Family--After

After
Harris, Lee Roy and family
before 1912